Is it okay to fail on purpose?

An interesting thing is happening to America’s pastime. Instead of spending money on acquiring the best players this offseason, up to one-third of Major League Baseball teams are, instead, choosing to (for the lack of a more accurate term) stink in 2018. It’s complicated. In short, they’re doing this on purpose as part of a…

When No-One is Looking

¬†Earlier this month, a group of students asked me an important question about online quizzes. “How will my professor know if I’m using my book and notes during an online quiz I complete at home?” they asked. “It doesn’t matter,” I said, “she asked you not to use them.” Some scoffed. Others looked frustrated. I…

3 Takeaways from The Power of Ethical Management

One of the books I like to assign when students get caught cheating is Kenneth Blanchard and Norman Peale’s The Power of Ethical Management. It is succinct and practical. Its opening section begins with an anecdote by one of the authors in which he is faced with an ethical dilemma and seeks out advice from…

Why We Lie

A recent article in National Geographic (sometimes behind a pay wall, sometimes not) takes a look at some interesting new research across disciplines on lying: why we do it, why it was important to learn how in the first place, how the brains of frequent liars are different, and why refuting that patently false story…

The Next Right Thing

This week, I ran across this remarkable column by Jeff Schultz of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He writes about the personal struggles of the Atlanta Falcons’ new offensive coordinator, Steve Sarkisian. Sarkisian, who is an admitted alcoholic, has seen his life come full circle since being terminated from his position as the head football coach at…